ICC ASSESSMENT

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Contact Chris Black at chris@islandsailing.org with questions, for more information or to register!

International Certificate of Competence (icc)

1 day assessment ICC

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Sailing Internationally? The pinnacle of recreational sailing licenses is the International Certificate of Competence (ICC). The ICC is the only sailing license recognized by the United Nations, and it is quickly gaining global acceptance as an international standard for sailing and chartering abroad.

overview

Where: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

When: Periodically through 2019 (each separate 1-day assessments)

Assessor: Capt. Mark Thompson

Price: $450 (Assessment only- any needed knowledge coursework is additional)

Certification: ICC

Prerequisite: RYA Day Skipper or NauticEd Bareboat Charter Master knowledge/theory, and 30' to 40' sailboat practical experience.

Meet RYA Instructor Capt. Mark Thompson

RYA & NauticEd Instructor, ICC Assessor, Catamaran Expert

Mark Thompson with Yachting Education is the Assessor. He is an RYA Sailing Instructor with over 20 years of instruction experience. Mark's one of the best, is very patient and puts student at ease. While the ICC Assessment is pass-fail, Mark creates a positive and low-stress environment for candidates. As the Principal and Chief Instructor for Yachting Education, Mark Thompson has a significant sailing resume including multiple Atlantic Ocean crossings and experience in Caribbean, Mediterranean, Australian and US waters.

ICC Requirements

There are distinct differences between US and International training standards. And whereas ICC is a legal standard many countries, charterers require experience and training well beyond ICC standards. Confused? It's actually rather simple and US Sailors need only prepare with the following:

1. NauticEd RYA Day Skipper Course or Bareboat Charter Master: These 30-40 hour online classes provide the knowledge required to pass the ICC. If you are extremely experienced, then it should take you about 15-20 hours to jump through it. The course is fun, light and entertaining. It is NOT defensive driving adult time out; you’ll really have fun and learn some amazing “stuff”. Note, again, this involves International standards, not just US certification - so, the knowledge training includes international standards. More info.

2. Experience & Training: We recommend that you train through Bareboat level courses (or possess equivalent experience) and have a 5+ days of recent big boat sailing skipper experience. Sailing is sailing, right? Yes, except the ICC is earned and not a sailor's 'mulligan' from a respectful RYA instructor. Since the dawn of sailing, sailors have emphasized training + experience - there's no exception with ICC. Better to be prepared.

3. ICC Assessment: The assessment is explained in detail below, but basically a 6hr examination by a RYA Instructor.

ICC Preparation

Most US sailing programs follow a progression from Bareboat class upwards to Bareboat and Navigation. Unless you have a wealth of experience, we recommend either you train through NauticEd Bareboat Charter Master (if US Sailing or ASA, you'll need supplemental maneuvering and navigation - their Bareboat standards are lower than international standards) OR complete RYA Day Skipper online course. Either should prepare you for an ICC Assessment by a RYA instructor.

With experience and the prerequisites, a sailor can take the ICC Assessment at any time it's offered. Below we've outlined different training paths that incorporate the ICC....

First, note that the ICC is a minimal International Standard, and so training and/or experience through Bareboat is recommended for chartering.

Alternatively, sailors can integrate the RYA Day Skipper knowledge into their overall training. The key differences are (a) the RYA knowledge examination is graded by an RYA instructor, (b) International standards are incorporated, and (c) Coastal Navigation training is accelerated from Bareboat to a Skipper, or Cruising, level of training. The initial investment is slightly more, but the training is more comprehensive and the long-term investment in courses is less than adding the ICC later.

ICC Preparation

Most US sailing programs follow a progression from Bareboat class upwards to Bareboat and Navigation. Unless you have a wealth of experience, we recommend either you train through NauticEd Bareboat Charter Master (if US Sailing or ASA, you'll need supplemental maneuvering and navigation - their Bareboat standards are lower than international standards) OR complete RYA Day Skipper online course. Either should prepare you for an ICC Assessment by a RYA instructor.

With experience and the prerequisites, a sailor can take the ICC Assessment at any time it's offered. Below we've outlined different training paths that incorporate the ICC....

First, note that the ICC is a minimal International Standard, and so training and/or experience through Bareboat is recommended for chartering.

Alternatively, sailors can integrate the RYA Day Skipper knowledge into their overall training. The key differences are (a) the RYA knowledge examination is graded by an RYA instructor, (b) International standards are incorporated, and (c) Coastal Navigation training is accelerated from Bareboat to a Skipper, or Cruising, level of training. The initial investment is slightly more, but the training is more comprehensive and the long-term investment in courses is less than adding the ICC later.

The ICC Assessment

The ICC assessment is an on-the-water examination by a RYA Instructor. It's a practical test of your sailing ability and knowledge. There's no written test, however the instructor will verbally examine candidates on the spot and while underway. The ICC is earned and the ICC Assessment is Pass or Fail.

Candidates need to be skilled with sailing and boat-handling - but also need to be fully versed in INTERNATIONAL standards. For example: Candidates should be proficient with Navigation, including knowledge of tides and heading calculations based on current, leeway, magnetic variation, International Rules etc.... Candidates should easily and comfortably be able to make a passage plan as well as have knowledge of IALA-A and IALA-B, Cardinal marks, ATONs with respective night lights.

First, note that the ICC is a minimal International Standard, and so training and/or experience through Bareboat is recommended for chartering.

Alternatively, sailors can integrate the RYA Day Skipper knowledge into their overall training. The key differences are (a) the RYA knowledge examination is graded by an RYA instructor, (b) International standards are incorporated, and (c) Coastal Navigation training is accelerated from Bareboat to a Skipper, or Cruising, level of training. The initial investment is slightly more, but the training is more comprehensive and the long-term investment in courses is less than adding the ICC later.

Refund and Cancellation Policy

The ICC Assessment requires the travel and time of a RYA instructor, and as such it's a non-refundable commitment unless we can find another candidate to take your spot. As a practical matter, and should the course be rescheduled or cancelled due to weather or circumstances beyond Island Sailing's control, we'll work directly with candidates on rescheduled dates or refunds. NauticEd's RYA Day Skipper or Bareboat Charter Master online courses are purchased from NauticEd, and as such NauticEd's refund policies apply.

Frequently Asked Questions

I'm ASA Bareboat certified with the IPC [International Proficiency Certificate]. What's the difference?

#1 difference is that the IPC is a private company designation and not recognized by the United Nations or any official US Governing body. The ICC is often compulsory whereas the IPC may or may not be accepted as equivalent.
Even as professional sailors, we're not entirely certain what's going to happen after we cast off. We train, plan and prepare. We learn to make no excuses. And, that gives us the confidence to completely immerse ourselves and enjoy the challenges. We reach our destinations, often exhausted, but that intuitive sense of discovery doesn't stop there. Whether at land or sea, we play and explore.

#2 as a training distinction, the IPC does not meet international training standards on generally accepted knowledge and practical requirements. An example is that ICC typically requires Navigation, which is not an IPC requirement.Even as professional sailors, we're not entirely certain what's going to happen after we cast off. We train, plan and prepare. We learn to make no excuses. And, that gives us the confidence to completely immerse ourselves and enjoy the challenges. We reach our destinations, often exhausted, but that intuitive sense of discovery doesn't stop there. Whether at land or sea, we play and explore.

#3 what countries do or do not accept can be fickle, the rules change continuously, and while a country (like Croatia) may accept the IPC - there's no guarantee it'll except it next month or year. By comparison, the ICC is an UN Resolution that's molded and governed by the participating countries. NOTE: often in other countries, individual ports and moorages may require legally accepted proof of competency, and so it's not just the charter company that's assessing the requirements....

Bottom line: if you plan to sail from a country that requires ICC, then it's best for you, your sailing investment and time abroad to get the required licensing.

I'm Bareboat certified, can I get the ICC?

Absolutely! Everyone's background, experience, training and goals are different; and so we recommend you simply contact us, and we'll recommend what may be needed to augment your training for the ICC.

Why do you need the ICC?

The ICC is the only sailing license accepted by European Countries. It was created by United Nations to be the World’s International Recreational License. The list of countries requiring the ICC is growing. For now it is most all of Europe including chartering on the Mediterranean and popular chartering countries such as Croatia, France, Belize and Greece et al.

On top of that, the ICC is the pinnacle of sailing recreation licenses. Wouldn’t you want the best and the one that is accepted everywhere; an International United Nations license that you are proud to show off?

How good of a sailor must I be to pass the Assessment?

The assessment will be conducted on the water. It is a practical test of your sailing ability with on the spot verbal questions while underway. You must be fully versed in Navigation including knowledge of tides and heading calculations based on current, leeway, magnetic variation, International Rules etc. You should easily and comfortably be able to make a passage plan. You must have knowledge of IALA-A and IALA-B, Cardinal marks, ATONs with respective night lights.

The RYA Day Skipper Course (for example) fully covers all the international theory knowledge you must have regarding Navigation and International Rules. If you pass that course you should not have any problem with the knowledge requirements. If you're already Bareboat certified, then contact us to review what supplemental knowledge may be needed.

The remaining is your sailing ability. We suggest you review the ICC materials (links noted above) and are comfortable with those sailing maneuvers while skippering a 30' to 40' sailboat. While the skill requirements are clear, the assessor can elect to test those skills in a variety of ways. For example, be prepared to run crew-overboard maneuvers with a fender (without jibing), or possibly sail to a mooring ball or dock.

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